Can you dance the Salsa? Classic India & Tito Nieves, “No Me Conviene”

“…Latin music is so positive, festive and optimistic. Its is made of what the USA and, indeed the world needs more of these days…”

I grew up with radio in New York City; I went to school (the right way) integrated with European Caucasians, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans (unknown to me when I was little) and other black American descendants of American slaves – there was no such thing as an “African-American” back then, by the way; they had not been allowed to assault into our shores – we had a good mix in the 1960s and 1970s!

Now that I am decluttering and finding past memories of my DJ life, I’ve discovered and am -among others – reliving the musical magic of the Bronx!

The title of this song means – according to your dialect – “That doesn’t suit me”, or ‘Its not worthy for me”. Please correct me in the comments section, if I’m off-base. Language and linguistics is king to cohesion.

Irregardless, Latin music is so positive, festive, inclusive and optimistic. Its is made of what the USA and, indeed the world needs much more of these days!

Again I implore you to disconnect from the negative #cableTV #24hour news, in-favor of quieting your mind into the peace our parents raised in us, please. Whatever will BE, will be.

Please remember to flash back to our mothership connection blog, achilliad.wordpress.com, where silence is avoiding negativity.

The Hope of Earth Wind & Fire’s “Beauty”of 1972 still Applies, unfortunately & hopefully for mankind’ sake.

“You know it troubles my mind
These troubled times we need love
The world needs love, let there be love
Open up your heart and love more open up…”

Beauty

Earth, Wind & Fire

Oh when I look around me
This old world seems so troubled to me

Does no one see
The beauty that surrounds them?
Take a look around you now (sometimes)
Pretty little blossoms, oh yeah
Just as sweet as can be, yeah yeah

it troubles my mind
These troubled times we need love
You know it troubles my mind
These troubled times we need love
The world needs love, let there be love
Open up your heart and love more open up
Open up your heart and love more open up
Open up your heart and love more open up
Open up your heart, give a little love
love, love, love, love

Does no one see
The beauty that surrounds them?
Take a look around you now (sometimes)
Pretty little blossoms, oh yeah
Just as sweet as can be, yeah yeah

It troubles my mind
These troubled times

We need love, love, love, yeah

It troubles my mind
These troubled times

Source: LyricFind

Songwriters: Donald Whitehead / Maurice White / Wade Flemons

Beauty lyrics © Concord Music Publishing LLC, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Time Tunnel 2022: Kool and the Gang at The Blue Note w/DJ Jimi B

Their first album, 1969

This is the second in my 2022 series of remembered radio interviews which I conducted during my heydays on music radio as a Disc Jockey for forty years.  Jersey City, New Jersey’s Kool & The Gang were, if memory serves me correctly, one of/if not thee first band my parents, who kept a tight reign on me, allowed me to go and see by myself. The timing was late by today’s “standards” but timely in retrospect.  I saw them first at the RKO Alden Theater on Jamaica Avenue and then at the Loews’s Valenca, which was across the street from the Alden.  Shortly thereafter, their first Album, “Kool and the Gang” came out on De-Lite Records in 1969.

Back in the day, my new neighbors wanted to form a band, which was the thing to do if you played a musical instrument back then.  Forced to practice the trumpet, I briefly found an outlet with those like-minded neighbors who moved into the neighborhood and had two sons the same age as I was.  Of course, we emulated Kool and the Gang’s horn-based group (as many of them were in those days – see Chicago, Blood Sweat & Tears, Tower of Power or The Ides Of March) by learning new hits like “Chocolate Buttermilk”, “Let The Music Take Your Mind” and their title track, dance steps included!

“The Frog”

Mostly confined to the R&B/Soul/Urban or Black Music chart of the Billboard, Cashbox and Record World music industry magazines of the day, Kool, et al, would not “cross over” into the mainstream of Top 40 recognition until after “Celebration” came out in 1980.

 “Ladies Night” (1979) also took the band into the mainstream and was a very hot request during my gigs in the 1980s and ‘90s. I ended-up getting all of my early DJ Promo copies of their albums from Mr. Ted Eddy (“Mister Teddy” they called him, affectionately) from De-Lite Records’ office in midtown Manhattan, NYC thought the mid-1980s.

I can’t count how many times “Celebration” was requested at every wedding, graduation, anniversary or birthday party I spun since then – and by folks that I knew had never listened to Kool and the Gang previously! It was amusing.

Sadly, during the past couple of years, two of the founding member of the group died: Dennis “D.T.” Thomas (alto sax) and Ronald Bell (tenor sax, bass, keys), making us all feel just a little bit “older”.  Show business and longevity are not exactly compatible, in most cases.

November, 1976

I wish that the following recorded interview covered what I’ve written above, but alas, in 20/20 retrospect, maybe I was a wee bit awe-struck and I didn’t follow up my questions journalistically, while interviewing such guys as these, who I had idolized.  

 Here, backstage at The Blue Note, New York City, Kool (Robert Bell) talks about a future direction for the bank and we had five minutes of laughs.

Remember, for our non-musical musings swing over to the Mothership blog, https://achilliad.wordpress.com/

Time Tunnel 2022 – Nancy Wilson, Jazz Icon with Jimi B.

What delayed this new series is that The Creator told me “Your mum’s health and reclaiming your birthright is more important right now.” Therefore, into storage my “children” (music vinyls,cassettes, compact discs and other music media) went…until now…

Welcome to “On-Location from The Time Tunnel”. A new series of sharing my curating, where I revisit past celebrity interviews I landed, to educate and keep the feeling (and music) alive eternally. Now that my music collection is finally out of storage, I wish to – with apologies to you who were a fan of the “My Vinyls” on my mothership blog, achilliad.wordpress.com – catch up on some of these artists who have been on my mind to share.  Unfortunately, and true to part of the reason that I started writing these tributes, some/many of them are not with us anymore in the physical world.  

One such superstar, who I wish I’d had the ability to get around to while she was alive, is Nancy Wilson, the singer who taught me, the English major, the usage of the word “superfluous” during this interview in 1994! Ms. Wilson recorded over fifty albums on Capitol, Columbia music record labels and even had a television show at one point in her career! It was and still is and honor to have been in her company for this brief talk – so much so that it almost breaks me down to tears as I write these words. Please feel the magic and enjoy because in spite of it all, the best is yet to come. Here are a few of her albums, which I own:

 

To say she could “carry a tune” would be a gross understatement

Ms. Wilson transitioned on December 13, 2018.

Cassette

And now for the interview:

As always, remember to check out “the mothership”, www.achilliad.wordpress.com for recent, non-musical content.

We…Are Everyday People 2020

Its been a minute since I traversed over here to the Record Shoppe; we had to close due to the Plague.  Then, the riots broke out after Mr. Floyd’s murder and I boarded the windows up after I saw a white guy in an umbrella and raincoat smashing windows in Minneapolis – knowing immediately that he was a plant from a rabble-rouser group, planted by those insecure, anachronistic types who are afraid of anybody who doesn’t LOOK like they do! I’m sure you know who I mean – the current resident of the White House of the United States of America is one of their leaders.

Yet, this is a musik-only site, right?  Historically, musik has mixed with politics and social causes, rite? (Yes to both or go back to kindergarten and start over, please).   Therefore, I offer the following lyrics from the 1960s (where some wannabe dictators would want to take us back to, by the way), which still resonate these days, as a reminder to all, of our best side – and b why I am who I am – as Everyday People.

“Sometimes I’m right and I can be wrong
My own beliefs are in my song
The butcher, the banker, the drummer and then
Makes no difference what group I’m in
I am everyday people, yeah, yeah

There is a blue one who can’t accept the green one
For living with a fat one, trying to be a skinny one
And different strokes for different folks
And so on and so on and scooby dooby doo-bee
Ooh, sha sha
We got to live together

I am no better and neither are you
We are the same whatever we do
You love me, you hate me, you know me and then
You can’t figure out the bag I’m in
I am everyday people, yeah, yeah

There is a long hair that doesn’t like the short hair
For being such a rich one, that will not help the poor one
And different strokes for different folks
And so on and so on and scooby dooby doo-bee
Ooh, sha sha
We got to live together

There is a yellow one that won’t accept the black one
That won’t accept the red one, that won’t accept the white one
Different strokes for different folks
And so on and so on and scooby dooby doo-bee
Ooh, sha sha
I am everyday people”

Yo Sly!  You should do a 2020 version of this song!  It would be a timely hit, doncha think??

Thanks for flashing by and please  be sure to swing on over to “the Mothership” blog, www.achilliad.wordpress.com to see what’s been goin’ on.

End of Summer, Beach Bummer…

“…I rock to and fro like Ray Charles at the piano, as their trademark harmonies grow…”

As a lover of summer (as long as there is silently cool a/c at night to sleep in), the start of Autumn can be a bummer, which is one reason I love a  South Carolina beach, where I’ve enjoyed surf and sandy days in October!

That is as far south as I plan to trek ; maybe someday, I’ll buy a house there with an ocean-facing deck. September somehow also makes me always want to hear The Beach Boys.  Maybe because as a disc jockey, I’d never play them again in a typical year until their Christmas song.

This tune from their Holland Days (sauce) sessions, with new singer for the time-being, Blondie Chaplin is my Fall folly anthem.  It took me a “minute” to realize it was them singing it too!  Part of the problem was that it was played on Rock stations and the jocks rarely back-announced it; same for the Pop stations of those early 1970s days.   Still a smooth Indian Summer groove and its those trademark, in-unison background “ooos” and “ahhs” that ultimately give it away to my ears as a classic “Beach Bums” jam.  I rock to and fro like Ray Charles at the piano, as their harmonies grow.  Just like good vibes, fun, California Girls and T-birds, for my every summer, they sing the last words of inspiration:

“Seldom stumble, never crumble Try to tumble, life’s a rumble Feel the stinging I’ve been given Never ending, unrelenting Heartbreak searing, always fearing Never caring, persevering Sail on, sail on, sailor…”

 

My Vinyl: James Ingram Impressions

“…James Ingram and Jeffrey Osborne shared the same era in Urban soul music, competing for chart position in Billboard and other music industry trade magazines and papers of the day…”

I never, “Just Once”, met nor saw James Ingram “live” in-concert during my on-air disc jockey career travels from radio station-to-station. He wasn’t high on my list because he kind-of never rose to the level of Luther Vandross,, Lionel Richie or Al Green, but I dug his honest, loving sound and liked talking-up or back-announcing his records. He was maybe, too “clean”?

When “One Hundred Ways” came out in 1981, on Quincy Jones’ “The Dude” album (“the black album  cova”), I recall using that song to impress the lady of my desire who I was dating back then as a punctuation to a Valentine’s Day or anniversary day surprise.  It worked!

Dude

It is interesting how “Q” (Quincy Jones) always manages to find previously undiscovered voices and bring them to the fore successfully.

James Ingram and another similar R&B crooner, Jeffrey Osborne shared the same era in Urban soul music, competing for chart position in Billboard and other music industry trade magazines and papers of the day in the early 1980s.  I recall waking up to it in the middle of many afternoons when I was an overnight DJ – I was hooked by the soap opera, General Hospital at the time and somehow it became a theme song – I guess it was Luke and Laura’s love song…

PATTI-AUSTIN-JAMES-INGRAM-BABY-COME-TO-ME-Solero
 

I can still hear the late Frankie Crocker announce, “Patti Autin…James Ingram…Baby COME to Me….on 107.5,WBLS…” circa 1980.  

I have no special relationship between my vinyls of James Ingram.  They are just tools in his song catalog which, upon opening recall hints of past romance and love for me during that era.

 

 

Who Sang That?!

Its a game I play in my musical DJ mind as songs randomly “play” at any time of the night or day.

So last night as I lay,

In bed trying to fall asleep.

The light was off and the room darkest, when suddenly I heard, “And my feet begin to crumble…”  and couldn’t remember most of the rest except, “And that’s the way, that’s the way its meant to be/Our love will never die…”  Where’d that come from?  I asked myself and then began to play the game, “Who sang that!?”

Trini Lopez came to mind first because I could “hear” the Spanish guitar and rhythms. Often I amaze myself with the accuracy with which I remember blasts-from-the-past!  I knew this song was a hit on Top 40 radio back in my teen days.  Not wanting to get up and re-fire up the computer, I turned on my night light and scribbled what I remembered onto a sticky note pad.

Today, while researching something else on YouTube, it came back to me and I grabbed that note to see if I’d won my contest; went to Ask.com and just typed into the search field, “my feet begin to crumble” and “viola!”, I see the name Eddie Rambeau.  (“Wa,wa waaa”)   Hmmm, that doesn’t look or sound familiar, but I played the video and yes, it’s that song!  And the title?  I could have never guessed in a million tries, “Concrete And Clay”.

I would write more background on Eddie and this record, but this video gives it all to you first-hand.  Click on the YouTube logo in the lower right-hand corner for more 411 from the poster of this legendary tune.  With that, please Listen, Read and En-joy….

 

 

Do you remember it?

“Lets Give Them Something To Talk About…”

“…Bonnie Raitt impresses me as a veteran who knows a thing or two, and who music industry types cannot put “something over” on. ..”

Bonnie_Raitt_at_John_Edwards_presidential_campaign

Out of the blue, or maybe her red hair (now with a white streak!), my jukebox-like mind selected this classic 1992 Bonnie Raitt jam on this cold, winter’s night, to keep me warm. I had to write the title down on a sticky because I knew I wanted to blog it here, as my first Grammy winning recording artist revisit post of 2018.  I like this song! It smacks of keeping things going and controversy.  Maybe I’ve played it during my early Top 40 radio DJ days on an overnight stint or two, but it didn’t phase me as much as it does now.  Music is peculiar like that. Like when suddenly, you recognize the words to a favorite song you’ve heard and mumbled through thousands of times!

A cute redhead in tight blue jeans passed me as I was leaving Publix supermarket this afternoon. Her back was to me, pursuing a shopping cart, when I said softly, “Bonnie Raitt”. She caught it; turned and smiled at me.  Maybe I should have taken it further than just a return smile.  Seems like I’m trying to “get lucky” at Publix these days.  Hmmm.  Maybe I can give them workers there somethin’ to talk about, like a love connection! I digress…

In the video below, you can enjoy this confident and talented woman who crosses musical genres like a New York City pedestrian crosses the street.  I didn’t know that she had a guitar named after her, and is the first female guitarist to have received that honor (Fender)! Major props.

Bonnie Raitt impresses me as a veteran who knows a thing or two, and who music industry types cannot put “something over” on.  She’s got that “look” in her eye.  A rock and Roll Hall of Famer, she also reminds me of my musical acquaintance, Janey Street, who also plays guitar.

I would love to interview her and apply my two score in radio as a DJ to a future review.

 

Check her cool website out! https://www.bonnieraitt.com/

Please add your impressions on Bonnie in “comments”. Happy New Year 2018!